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Impact on our society

State of the disease

In 2019, there are about 5.8 million Americans living with dementia.

1 in 10 people in the US over the age of 65 have Alzheimer's disease.

People are living longer than ever before. As people live longer, the number of people with Alzheimer’s and other diseases is expected to rise. The yearly number of new cases could double by 2050.

But that number could be much higher. Medical records show that less than half of the people who get Medicare have been told they have Alzheimer's or dementia.

The map below shows how the percent of people with Alzheimer's could rise in each state until 2025. In every state in the US, Alzheimer's diagnoses could rise at least 12% by 2025. Arizona and Alaska could have the highest jumps. Nevada and Vermont could also see much higher rates of Alzheimer's.

Adapted from Alzheimer's Association Facts & Figures 2019. The map uses data given to the Alzheimer's Association by Wevue.

Map of the US

Scientists think a lot of people in the US have not been told yet that they have Alzheimer's, even if they have it. They may show signs and symptoms of it. A doctor has to be the one to diagnose Alzheimer's. This is why it is important to tell a doctor if you or a loved one is showing signs or symptoms.

Alzheimer’s is the 6th leading cause of death in the US

It’s difficult to know how many people die from Alzheimer’s. The number might be much higher than we think. Alzheimer's can lead to things like pneumonia. Sometimes, things like this are listed as the cause of death, even if it was really because of Alzheimer's.

Studies show that the number of deaths because of Alzheimer's is rising. Death because of Alzheimer's went up 145% between 2000 and 2017.

As of 2019, there are an estimated 5.8 million Americans living with dementia.

1 in 10 people in the US over the age of 65 have Alzheimer's disease.

As people live longer, the number of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is expected to rise. The annual number of new cases could double by 2050.

But that number could actually be much higher. Medical records show that less than half of the people who receive Medicare have an Alzheimer's or dementia diagnosis.

Researchers believe a lot of people in the US have not yet been diagnosed with Alzheimer's, even if they have it. A person may experience signs and symptoms, but ultimately a doctor has to be the one to diagnose Alzheimer's. This is why it is important to tell a doctor if you or a loved one is showing signs or symptoms.

The map below shows the expected increase in Alzheimer's prevalence in each state between 2019 and 2025. Every state in the US will see at least a 12% increase in Alzheimer's diagnoses by 2025. Arizona (42.9%) and Alaska (37.5%) could see the largest increases in the nation, followed by Nevada (36.2%) and Vermont (30.8%).

Adapted from Alzheimer's Association Facts & Figures 2019. Data for this map were provided by Weuve to the Alzheimer's Association.

Map of the US

Alzheimer’s is the 6th leading cause of death in the US

It’s difficult to know how many deaths are caused by Alzheimer’s; often, secondary causes, like pneumonia, are listed as the cause of death, even when caused by Alzheimer's. The actual mortality rate might be higher. Studies show that deaths due to Alzheimer's are on the rise. There was a 145% increase in death from Alzheimer’s from 2000-2017.

As of 2019, estimates indicate that 5.8 million Americans are living with dementia.

1 in 10 people in the US aged 65 and older have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s

As life expectancy increases, the number of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other diseases is projected to increase. The annual incidence of new cases is expected to double by 2050.

But that number could be much higher. Medical records show that less than half of the people who receive Medicare have an Alzheimer's or dementia diagnosis.

Researchers believe there are a significant number of undiagnosed people living with Alzheimer's in the US. Though a person may experience signs and symptoms of the disease, a doctor is ultimately the one to diagnose Alzheimer's. This is why it is important to tell a doctor if you or a loved one is showing signs or symptoms.

The map below illustrates the projected increase of Alzheimer's prevalence in each state between 2019 and 2025. Every state in the US will see at least a 12% increase in Alzheimer's diagnoses by 2025; Arizona (42.9%) and Alaska (37.5%) could see the largest increases in the US, followed by Nevada (36.2%) and Vermont (30.8%).

Use the map below to understand the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's throughout the United States. Adapted from Alzheimer's Association Facts & Figures 2019. Data were provided to the Alzheimer's Association by Weuve.

Map of the US

Alzheimer’s is the 6th-leading cause of death in the US

It’s challenging to determine the incidence of Alzheimer’s-related deaths. Often a secondary cause of death such as pneumonia is listed, even if the death was ultimately caused by Alzheimer's. The actual mortality rate might be higher than some projections. Studies indicate that deaths due to Alzheimer's are increasing; a 145% increase in death from Alzheimer’s occurred from 2000-2017.

NEXT: How Alzheimer’s affects us all

References: 1. Alzheimer's Facts & Figures. 2. Alzheimer's disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/aging/aginginfo/alzheimers.htm#Who. Accessed October 8, 2019.